2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD
2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD
2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD
2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD. Click image to enlarge

Join Autos’s Facebook group
Follow Autos on Twitter

Review and photos by Michael Clark

Find this vehicle in Autos’s Classified Ads

Photo Gallery:
2009 Ford Escape

Be wise; accessorize.

As more and more consumers are feeling the collapsed building-style of credit crush that’s sweeping the nation, the marriage of practicality and functionality could not be more in vogue; if only we weren’t so spoiled. Option packages have gone far and beyond the paltry trifecta of air, tilt, and cruise. Leather, heated seats, deep tint glass, and the latest in voice prompt Navigation have become the new basic equipment for many potential vehicle buyers. In the recent past, having it all meant the biggest powertrain, sure-footed all-wheel traction, and a price that could have dealership personnel searching for the smelling salts to bring you around.

Ford was one of the first manufacturers to embrace the marketing potential of a thick list of options. (See 1964 1/2 Mustang.) Well-appointed interiors with the latest in creature comforts were often equipped with a pokey inline six on the original Pony car. The 2009 Ford Escape is by no means a Mustang, but it does allow a very heavy list of optional features to be added to this week’s tester. The kicker is that these comforts can be had with a base four-cylinder mill, and front wheel drive, for an MSRP of $32,729.00. (Prices shown do not include freight, taxes, or regional incentives.)

The Cockpit/Centre Stack

The Escape cockpit keeps things status quo, with regard to the layout of driver controls. The addition of the optional SYNC system adds a voice prompt key to the steering wheel-mounted control tabs, as well as phone hang-up. Cruise and audio controls are also included.

2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD
2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD
2009 Ford Escape XLT FWD. Click image to enlarge

The column receives a manual tilt, with no telescope. Headlamps are equipped with an auto position, with a pull function added to the dial to engage the fog lamps. Information display access keys are not in the best position, ahead of the driver’s left knee. Service intervals, power lock/lighting sequences, and three language settings (English, French, and Spanish) can be found within the display.

Wiper functions continue to be mounted on the overwhelmed turn signal multi-stalk, including rear wiper swipe/squirt. The driver’s door houses power window controls, with an Auto descent for the driver, as well as the power toggle for the heated exterior mirrors. The driver’s door also adds the classic Ford numbered keypad entry system.

The centre stack provides manual tuning for the HVAC system, auxiliary input for MP3 players, USB port, and a 12-volt DC powerpoint. Much like the information display keys, the AdvanceTrac traction control switch is practically hidden, far below the line of sight for safe use. The highlight of the centre stack is the combination of the SYNC system with the Navi screen. In addition to easy-to-understand voice prompts, keywords are displayed on the screen to guide the user with minimal frustration. Bluetooth connectivity presented minimal stress, though voice quality of those calling in was so-so in clarity. The parking brake floor pedal presented no snag issues, while the new-for-Oh-Nine six-speed automatic adds a hill descent switch on the shifter. On the weirdness front: the turn signal audible ‘clicker’ sounds just like the initial percussion beat of Low Rider by War. Take a little trip and see.

Pages: 1 2 3 All

Connect with Autos.ca