2010 Hyundai Tucson
2010 Hyundai Tucson. Click image to enlarge

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Hyundai Canada

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2010 Hyundai Tucson

Los Angeles, California – Riding a wave of consumer enthusiasm for its products, Hyundai Canada is set to introduce the fully redesigned Tucson compact SUV in January, 2010.

Designed in Europe, the new Tucson will maintain Hyundai’s presence in one of the two most popular vehicle categories in Canada (compact SUVs and compact cars), while giving the company a stronger contender compared with the outgoing model.

Available in front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive (now with AWD lock) versions, the 2010 Tucson loses the V6 option, offered in the 2005-2009 model.

2010 Hyundai Tucson
2010 Hyundai Tucson
2010 Hyundai Tucson. Click image to enlarge

“More buyers in this sector choose a four-cylinder engine,” explained John Vernile, Vice President Marketing, of Hyundai Motors Canada, adding that the new 2.4-litre engine is more powerful than the previous model’s V6, and more fuel efficient than the retired 2.0-litre “four”. Indeed, direct competitors like the Honda CR-V and Nissan Rogue also offer only four-cylinder engines.

The new engine makes 176 horsepower at 6,000 r.p.m. and 168 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 r.p.m., and is mated to a choice of six-speed manual (available on the base model only) and six-speed automatic transmissions, with 95 per cent of buyers expected to select a model with automatic transmission. Fuel economy for the AWD model is expected to be 9.8/7.1 L/100 km, city/highway; 8.6 combined; and for the FWD models with automatic, 9.0/6.3 L/100 km; 7.8 combined.

Those familiar with the previous generation Tucson will note that the new version is slightly wider (+25 mm), longer (+115 mm) and not quite as tall (-45 mm). It’s also about 30 kilograms lighter. Interior space, despite the reduction in height, is increased. This is partly attributed to the new, more compact, multi-link rear suspension, which, while providing greater rear stability and quietness, barely intrudes into the cargo compartment. The wheelbase is also slightly longer, providing more legroom for rear-seat occupants.

2010 Hyundai Tucson
2010 Hyundai Tucson
2010 Hyundai Tucson. Click image to enlarge

The outgoing Tucson was quite the bargain in its time, offering standard electronic stability control, traction control, side curtain airbags and power windows, locks, mirrors; along with an array of amenities that in total made it one of the most generously equipped and lowest priced vehicles in the segment.

The 2010 Tucson continues the full-featured theme, and in typical Hyundai fashion, raises the bar. Three trim levels are offered — GL, GLS and Limited — with the GL setting the low price point. Even so, the GL features a repeating lane change function for the turn signal, Downhill Brake Control (engaged by the driver at speeds below 35 km/h, and enabling a controlled eight km/h descent when required), and Hill Start Assist (a two-second delay prevents the Tucson from rolling back when stopped on a steep hill). Bluetooth is also standard, along with two 12-volt power points at the base of the centre stack, and a USB input. Likewise, a trip computer and steering-wheel mounted audio controls are standard, and interior fit and finish has improved both in design and execution.

Additional standard equipment includes air conditioning, power windows with driver auto-down, tilt steering column, folding outside mirrors, heated power mirrors, remote keyless entry, anti-lock brakes, 160-watt, six-speaker audio and 17-inch steel wheels.

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