2010 Honda Crosstour
2010 Honda Crosstour. Click image to enlarge

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Honda Canada

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Review and photos by Paul Williams

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2010 Honda Crosstour

Toronto, Ontario – For quite a while now, automakers have shied away from the term, “station wagon.” Such vehicles, it is felt, imply too much practicality and not enough style. For many they’re just too old-fashioned — it’s what their parents drove, or their grandparents, even — they have no vitality, no flair. Who wants to be associated with something like that?

But a 2010 Honda Crosstour… well, here’s a nice-looking, stylish vehicle that seems to have all the benefits of a wagon, without the stereotype and without the boxy profile. And it’s available with all-wheel drive, has 205 millimetres of ground clearance, 18-inch alloy wheels (19s are available from the dealer) and pulls hard with its 271-horsepower V6 engine. Looks sporty, too!

2010 Honda Crosstour
2010 Honda Crosstour. Click image to enlarge

No, Honda doesn’t describe the Crosstour as a wagon, but the word did come up a few times at its Canadian launch in Toronto. As you’d expect (from the name, of course…) Honda describes the Crosstour as crossover, or CUV. It’s targeted primarily at empty-nesters, active singles and couples whose kids are finally on their way (out, that is): baby boomers, in other words.

The Crosstour is based on the Accord platform (its full name is Honda Accord Crosstour), and represents a step up from the Accord sedan and coupe. Although based on the Accord Sedan, none of its exterior panels are shared with other Accords. It has four doors, with lots of rear seating room to accommodate friends or kids’ kids. It’s got a wide hatchback (or liftgate, if you prefer), enabling owners to easily transport large items like the new gourmet barbeque or mega-golf bags and luggage for a week.

2010 Honda Crosstour
2010 Honda Crosstour
2010 Honda Crosstour. Click image to enlarge

Below the reversible carpeted/plastic floor of the cargo area is a 54-litre removable and washable storage box. The rear seats fold forward via handy levers at the rear of the car so you don’t have to walk around and reach in from the rear doors. There are plenty of containers, cubbies, cupholders, pockets and surfaces to store your personal knick-knacks as required.

In my experience, Boomers like a little luxury to go with their utility, and in this the Crosstour also obliges; it being a premium vehicle whose specification matches that of the top-level EX-L Accord.

Crosstour features chrome door handles, stainless sill plates and brushed metal fittings inside, and standard equipment includes leather interior, automatic climate control, new five-speed automatic transmission with downshift rev-matching; 360-watt, seven-speaker audio with USB interface and satellite radio; compass and outside temperature gauge, fog lights, moonroof, power heated front seats with driver-side memory, memory side-mirrors with tilt, cargo privacy cover, Homelink transmitter and wood-trim interior accents. It’s pretty swank in that cabin; not pretentious, mind you, but definitely a cut above.

The full-time all-wheel drive is optional, and is a first for North American Accords, I believe. Also optional is a Navigation package that includes Bluetooth connectivity and a rear camera to help when reversing. However, the Navigation package is available only with the AWD vehicle, although Honda expects the AWD version to be the most popular.

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