2013 Ford Fusion Titanium AWD
2013 Ford Fusion Titanium AWD
2013 Ford Fusion Titanium AWD
2013 Ford Fusion Titanium AWD
2013 Ford Fusion Titanium AWD. Click image to enlarge

Review and photos by Jacob Black

If you don’t think car prices have moved much in the past few years, I can half understand you. Truth is they’ve stayed about the same. But “price”, is not the same thing as “value”, and if you think value has remained unchanged, well the Ford Fusion Titanium is here to tell you different.

It’s already one of the best-looking family sedans on the market with a yawning maw and sculpted profile that give the Fusion a more affluent appearance than you might expect. This generation is a dramatic leap forward for the brand. In Titanium trim, you get an added rear spoiler that adds to the muscular profile. The Fusion is also an example of the “super-sizing” prevalent across the previous decade, especially in mid-size family sedans. This thing isn’t mid-size, this thing is big.

Ford packs in its 2.0L four-cylinder EcoBoost engine, which wields 240 hp (231 on regular fuel) and 270 lb-ft (at 5,500 rpm and 3,000 rpm, respectively). In Titanium trim, that power is transmitted to all four corners via a six-speed auto and full-time all-wheel drive. That is more performance than I expected and the 1,670 kg chassis is easily hauled up to the speed limit. Passing is easy too and squirting into merge-gaps isn’t stressful.

When you first see the Fusion you think, “you know, that’s pretty big”, followed quickly by “hey, where’d it all go?!” as soon as you climb inside. Editor Jonathan Yarkony pointed out the high and wide console as a big space eater – and he’s right. It turns the cabin into two individual pods, rather than one airy, open-plan command centre.

The power-adjustable seat and tilt/telescopic wheel make finding a comfortable position easy and the leather seats are supportive without being firm. The steering wheel won’t win any beauty contests but gives excellent control over the in-car systems. There are a lot of buttons here but they’re not difficult to figure out. This edition is equipped with MyFordTouch – the top-end edition of the Microsoft-designed Sync system.

As part of that system there is an eight-inch touchscreen in the centre stack, and integrated screens in the dashboard instrument cluster. It features a shapely housing with the analogue speedo in the centre above a retro-look gear position indicator. To the left, there is a customizable trip computer with fuel economy, the usual complement of distances, times and averages plus a digital tach. To the right is the MyFordTouch infotainment screen that can display climate controls, information about the radio station (as well as track and artist information if you’re using the Sirius XM capability), navigation, telephone information – including text messages and more. It’s all controllable by the steering wheel controls, which is good because the “pseudo-buttons” on the centre stack are awkward to use. The large knob in the centre is good for volume control, the rest of the “buttons” might as well not exist. Sure, it’s pretty, but so is a dandelion – they still bug me.

Connect with Autos.ca