All-new for 2007, the Sky is Saturn’s version of the Pontiac Solstice, which debuted in 2006. It’s Saturn’s first roadster, and is available in a regular or Red Line Version.

The regular Sky uses a 2.4-litre four-cylinder engine, while the Red Line carries a turbocharged, 2.0-litre direct-injection four-cylinder; both mate to a five-speed manual transmission that can be optioned to a five-speed automatic.

No longer tied to plastic body panels, Saturn uses hydroforming to create some of the Sky’s metal panels, which allow for the sharp creases and smooth curves that add to the Sky’s beautiful styling. The chassis’ tube structure is also hydroformed, creating a strong and rigid platform that holds together well even without a roof, with almost no body flexing or cowl shake. The undercarriage includes short-long arm suspension with forged aluminum control arms, Bilstein monotube shocks and hollow stabilizer bars; steering is hydraulic rack-and-pinion, and brakes are four-wheel discs with ABS.

Features on the Sky include 18-inch chromed aluminum wheels with performance tires, Ebony or Tan cloth top with glass rear window and electric defogger, variable intermittent wipers, air conditioning, floor mats, cruise control, cloth seats, CD player with auxiliary input jack, automatic headlamps and OnStar. Available options include leather seats, six-disc CD/MP3 stereo, and XM Satellite Radio.

The Red Line adds standard limited-slip differential, StabiliTrak electronic stability control, performance-tuned suspension, dual exhaust with chrome polished outlets, 18-inch polished aluminum alloy wheels, black headlamp bezels, unique lower front fascia with functional brake cooling vents, leather-wrapped wheel with audio controls, metallic sill plates, stainless steel pedal covers, Red Line-specific gauges and digital boost gauge in the Driver Information Centre.

The Saturn is a big car for a roadster, but it feels much smaller, thanks to nimble steering and a very stiff chassis. The base engine is fine for boulevard cruising, especially when it’s mated to the five-speed manual where the driver has control over the shifts, but enthusiasts will want the turbocharged Red Line.

The Sky has some glaring faults: its top is awkward and time-consuming to put up and down, requiring trips in and out of the vehicle to complete the operation. Even worse is its storage space, or rather, the fact that it has none: interior stowage is limited to a couple of small cubbies, and the fuel tank occupies almost the entire trunk, with just a shallow, narrow trench on the outside for stuffing in soft-sided objects.

On the plus side, it’s enjoyable to drive, thanks to that very stiff chassis, which keeps it well-planted, even on hard corners. And there’s much to be said for its drop-dead-gorgeous styling, which is even better than the already stunning Pontiac Solstice. You can forgive a lot in a car that looks this good.

All-new for 2007, the Sky is Saturn’s version of the Pontiac Solstice, which debuted in 2006. It’s Saturn’s first roadster, and is available in a regular or Red Line Version.

The regular Sky uses a 2.4-litre four-cylinder engine, while the Red Line carries a turbocharged, 2.0-litre direct-injection four-cylinder; both mate to a five-speed manual transmission that can be optioned to a five-speed automatic.

No longer tied to plastic body panels, Saturn uses hydroforming to create some of the Sky’s metal panels, which allow for the sharp creases and smooth curves that add to the Sky’s beautiful styling. The chassis’ tube structure is also hydroformed, creating a strong and rigid platform that holds together well even without a roof, with almost no body flexing or cowl shake. The undercarriage includes short-long arm suspension with forged aluminum control arms, Bilstein monotube shocks and hollow stabilizer bars; steering is hydraulic rack-and-pinion, and brakes are four-wheel discs with ABS.

Features on the Sky include 18-inch chromed aluminum wheels with performance tires, Ebony or Tan cloth top with glass rear window and electric defogger, variable intermittent wipers, air conditioning, floor mats, cruise control, cloth seats, CD player with auxiliary input jack, automatic headlamps and OnStar. Available options include leather seats, six-disc CD/MP3 stereo, and XM Satellite Radio.

The Red Line adds standard limited-slip differential, StabiliTrak electronic stability control, performance-tuned suspension, dual exhaust with chrome polished outlets, 18-inch polished aluminum alloy wheels, black headlamp bezels, unique lower front fascia with functional brake cooling vents, leather-wrapped wheel with audio controls, metallic sill plates, stainless steel pedal covers, Red Line-specific gauges and digital boost gauge in the Driver Information Centre.

The Saturn is a big car for a roadster, but it feels much smaller, thanks to nimble steering and a very stiff chassis. The base engine is fine for boulevard cruising, especially when it’s mated to the five-speed manual where the driver has control over the shifts, but enthusiasts will want the turbocharged Red Line.

The Sky has some glaring faults: its top is awkward and time-consuming to put up and down, requiring trips in and out of the vehicle to complete the operation. Even worse is its storage space, or rather, the fact that it has none: interior stowage is limited to a couple of small cubbies, and the fuel tank occupies almost the entire trunk, with just a shallow, narrow trench on the outside for stuffing in soft-sided objects.

On the plus side, it’s enjoyable to drive, thanks to that very stiff chassis, which keeps it well-planted, even on hard corners. And there’s much to be said for its drop-dead-gorgeous styling, which is even better than the already stunning Pontiac Solstice. You can forgive a lot in a car that looks this good.

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