For 2007, the BMW X5, the company’s full-size SUV, is redesigned and emerges as an all-new second generation. The new model is wider, taller and longer than its predecessor, is more powerful, and offers an optional third row of seats.

Two variations are available. The 3.0si uses a 3.0-litre inline six-cylinder, made of lightweight magnesium, while the 4.8i uses a 4.8-litre V8. Both use a six-speed automatic transmission, and feature xDrive all-wheel drive. The system distributes torque 40/60 under normal driving conditions, but can send up to 100 per cent power to either end; it does so proactively, using information from the dynamic stability control and other sensors to determine the possibility of wheel slippage, and the need to power up or brake a specific wheel before any lose their grip.

Features on the 3.0si include 18-inch alloy wheels, automatic adaptive Xenon headlamps, heated mirrors, washer jets and door locks, rain-sensing wipers, roof rails, rear washer/wiper, privacy glass, rear spoiler, heated power-adjustable steering wheel, automatic climate control, 10-way power-adjustable heated leather seats, CD/MP3 player, and pre-wiring for CD changer and satellite radio.

The 4.8i adds self-levelling rear air suspension, auto-dimming interior and exterior mirrors, Park Distance Control, and power panoramic sunroof.

The X5 has proven to be a winner for BMW; not wanting to mess with success, the company has made subtle changes to the vehicle’s styling that give it a more upscale appearance, but without moving too far away from the familiar. For the first time, Active Steering is available on an SUV; the system decreases wheel effort at lower speeds, making it easier to manoeuvre in tight spots. As with most three-row vehicles, the third row is tight and mostly fits smaller children, but unlike many of these vehicles, you don’t have to order it if you’d rather have the extra cargo space.

For 2007, the BMW X5, the company’s full-size SUV, is redesigned and emerges as an all-new second generation. The new model is wider, taller and longer than its predecessor, is more powerful, and offers an optional third row of seats.

Two variations are available. The 3.0si uses a 3.0-litre inline six-cylinder, made of lightweight magnesium, while the 4.8i uses a 4.8-litre V8. Both use a six-speed automatic transmission, and feature xDrive all-wheel drive. The system distributes torque 40/60 under normal driving conditions, but can send up to 100 per cent power to either end; it does so proactively, using information from the dynamic stability control and other sensors to determine the possibility of wheel slippage, and the need to power up or brake a specific wheel before any lose their grip.

Features on the 3.0si include 18-inch alloy wheels, automatic adaptive Xenon headlamps, heated mirrors, washer jets and door locks, rain-sensing wipers, roof rails, rear washer/wiper, privacy glass, rear spoiler, heated power-adjustable steering wheel, automatic climate control, 10-way power-adjustable heated leather seats, CD/MP3 player, and pre-wiring for CD changer and satellite radio.

The 4.8i adds self-levelling rear air suspension, auto-dimming interior and exterior mirrors, Park Distance Control, and power panoramic sunroof.

The X5 has proven to be a winner for BMW; not wanting to mess with success, the company has made subtle changes to the vehicle’s styling that give it a more upscale appearance, but without moving too far away from the familiar. For the first time, Active Steering is available on an SUV; the system decreases wheel effort at lower speeds, making it easier to manoeuvre in tight spots. As with most three-row vehicles, the third row is tight and mostly fits smaller children, but unlike many of these vehicles, you don’t have to order it if you’d rather have the extra cargo space.

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