The Chrysler Sebring really is the Rodney Dangerfield of cars. It gets no respect, downplayed even by its manufacturer to the point that many people think it no longer exists. But its stylish design is aging gracefully, and it remains good value as a four-door sedan, and a great bargain as a four-seater convertible.

For 2005, both sedan and convertible offer a new top-level Limited line, which includes automatic climate control and automatic headlamps. Three new interior and four new exterior colours are added for 2005, as well as an optional navigation system and real wood instrument panel bezels.

The base Sebring sedan includes a 2.4-litre in-line four-cylinder, along with air conditioning, disc/drum brakes (four discs with ABS are optional on all sedan lines), power locks with keyless entry, power mirrors, CD system with four speakers, power windows, 15-inch wheels and 60/40 folding rear seat.

The mid-line Touring carries a 2.7-litre V6, and includes fog lamps, 16-inch aluminum wheels and touring package with front and rear stabilizer bars.

The top-line Limited adds woodgrain instrument cluster bezel, illuminated vanity mirrors, heated leather seats with eight-way power driver’s side, leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio controls, and 16-inch chrome-clad aluminum wheels.

The Sebring convertible comes only with the six-cylinder, and with four disc brakes and sixteen-inch wheels. The base convertible model is otherwise similar to the sedan base model.

The convertible GTC adds “Ultrahide” low-back bucket seats with six-way power driver’s side, leather-wrapped wheel, six-speaker single CD system with wheel-mounted audio controls, fog lamps, rear spoiler and sport-tuned suspension.

The Touring includes leather-faced seats, while the Limited adds ABS and traction control, automatic climate control, auto-dimming mirror, automatic headlamps, heated seats, six-disc CD system, and chrome-clad 16-inch aluminum wheels.

The Sebring’s comfortable ride is more springy than taut; interior appointments are good, and if the fit-and-finish isn’t quite up to that of its Japanese competitors, its price range helps smooth over much of that. The exaggerated slope of its A-pillar can be problematic for tall drivers, and its tall trunk line makes backing up tougher than it needs to be. Interior space is very good, even in the rear seat; there’s plenty of space to drop the top and go cruising with friends.

Both sedan and convertible are manufactured in Sterling Heights, Michigan.

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