Inside Story: 2010 Honda Civic Si Coupe inside story honda
Inside Story: 2010 Honda Civic Si Coupe inside story honda
2010 Honda Civic Si coupe. Click image to enlarge

Below the centre stack is a 12-volt DC powerpoint, auxiliary audio jack, and two open cubbies, where flip-top or flexible roll-tops would be appreciated. There is a roll-top to cover the dual front cupholder. With its system of four spring cinchers per beverage, we’ve considered having the method bronzed. The centre armrest is well-padded, with simple-slide positioning. Lift the lid, and you’ll find a second 12-volt DC powerpoint, plus the USB tether for the audio system. A single storage pocket is found on the front passenger-side seatback. Flip-down rear hangers seem tough enough to hang copper pipe.

The Overhead

Dual vanity mirrors remain unlit on the hard-backed non-sliding visors. Looking at the indentations formed on the sides of the visors, Honda could consider incorporating card-style clips to flank the mirrors. The interior rear-view mirror is of the manual day/night variety. The tilt/slide sunroof uses a robust deflector biscuit.

Inside Story: 2010 Honda Civic Si Coupe inside story honda
Inside Story: 2010 Honda Civic Si Coupe inside story honda
Inside Story: 2010 Honda Civic Si Coupe inside story honda
2010 Honda Civic Si coupe. Click image to enlarge
Seat Treat

The driver’s seat gets a manual height adjustment lever. Seats are Si-specific, with bolstering bent on plenty of cornering and slalom exercises. Sadly, there’s no heat treat for the Si. Brrr. Warming up the practicality for the Coupe is the easy-entry right-hand sliding front seat. As most Coupe owners know, floormats are forever being misaligned for the second row. That probably explains the retainer sticking up through this slab of carpet.

Cargo Embargo

What, no trunk lid finisher? Strange, especially when the four door Si rates one. Seat backs are released via the pulls mounted on the underside of the parcel shelf. The pulls don’t send the seatbacks forward with catapult force, but they don’t fall back into Lock with the slightest of taps either, which can be even more annoying. Once collapsed, the load area is a respectable flat, with a sizable pass-through.

Spare Care

Removed for track exercises, the space-saver spare access needs work, with the cargo area floor. A simple cord-and hook tether could hold it aloft. Honda will change it for you, during the first three years, with no mileage limit.

The Mill

 
The larger 2.0-litre 197-horsepower four still provides respectable access to key components. Fluid fill points are without issue, including the clutch slave cylinder reservoir. Honda rates the Si combo at 10.2 litres per 100 kilometres City, and 6.8 litres per 100 kilometres Highway. For those keeping score, the 140-horsepower 1.8-litre four in the rest of the Civic Coupe line achieves 7.4 City, and 5.4 Highway with the manual.

The Verdict

 
(28) Honda is asking the question that any manufacturer poses with a multi-year old model: is the car still relevant? The point-of-view factors need to be much broader than flavour-of-the-model-year options. If the Civic is destined to carry on into 2011 unchanged, the good news is that heated seats simply need to be made available, outside of their current sequestering in the EX-L model. Bluetooth? Take a trip over to the Acura site, where the Canuck-CSX holds the HandsFreeLink system, albeit tied to the Navi head unit.

Inside Story: 2010 Honda Civic Si Coupe inside story honda
2010 Honda Civic Si coupe. Click image to enlarge

Once you wade through the awards, sales figures, and numerous accolades earned, the Civic is still the choice for the Looking For Mr. Goodcar set. These are the buyers who grew up in family units with Honda products. Remember when folks would only buy a GM because that’s what Dad always drove? The median age of the Si customer is 40, with a high male skew. This is probably a customer who’s owned enough junk to know that a Honda and service grief don’t tend to go together. Having worked in the automotive parts world for a time, Civics tended to need only two things; timing belts at 100,000 kilometres, and sway bar links in the land of bumpy roads. Like a Toyota Corolla, the Civic is an automotive Maytag. The difference is that the Civic still knows how to have fun.
 
Next week: Mazda CX-9

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