This week we are attempting a different approach with recalls. Instead of putting up a post for each recall, we are amalgamating them into a single news post each week. Cool, right? Let us know what you think in the comments.

There have been a lot of recalls over the last week. From the purveyor of beige that is Toyota to the aristocratic offerings from Bentley, we have them all here on Weekly Recall Recap.

Toyota

If you own a FJ Cruiser, it might be time to stop slamming the doors. Cracks can develop causing a pretty substantial failure with the seat belts.

So far, no corrective action is planned. But, if you have one of these Japanese jeeps, keep an eye on this, as it seems like a fix might become rather involved.

Years affected: 2008-2013
Units affected: 16,000

From Transport Canada: On certain vehicles, due to insufficient strength of the access door (rear door) panels, cracks may develop if the access doors are repeatedly and forcefully closed over an extended period of time. As the driver and front passenger seat belt retractors are mounted in the access door panels, if cracks occur in the panel around the lower retractor anchor, the seat belt retractors could become detached. This could increase the risk of injury to an occupant in the event of a crash. Correction: To be determined.

General Motors

You may have shifted into manual mode, but the machine wants to take back control of the cogs. Or at least the Buick LaCrosse and Cadillac SRX want it back, as these cars may switch back to fully automatic mode without warning after you’ve selected the Driver Shift Control mode for shifting.

The fix is to reprogram the transmission control module.

Years affected: 2013
Units affected: 1,275

From Transport Canada: On certain vehicles, the transmission may shift from Driver Shift Control (manual) to Sport (automatic shifting) unexpectedly. If the driver was slowing the vehicle using DSC (manual) mode to achieve engine braking, engine braking would be cancelled without warning. In conjunction with traffic and road conditions, and the driver’s reactions, this could increase the risk of a crash causing property damage and/or personal injury. Correction: Dealers will reprogram the transmission control module.

Honda

I feel bad for Honda. I really do. They’ve experienced some nasty recalls as of late. And there is more to come.

First, the Acura TSX has an ECU recall for northern climates where road salt and other substances which cause corrosion may melt from your boots, through the carpet, and onto the ECU. This could result in the engine stalling out suddenly and could increase the chances of a crash.

The fix is pretty simple: put a cover on undamaged ECUs and/or replace ECUs which have experienced a significant amount of corrosion.

Years affected: 2004-2008
Units affected: 16,990

From Transport Canada: On certain vehicles operated in areas where road salt and de-icing chemicals are used, if the driver enters the vehicle with a salt/snow mixture on their feet, this could melt and soak the carpet, allowing the salt-water solution to contact the base of the Engine Control Unit (ECU). As a result, the ECU could suffer corrosion damage, which may cause the engine to stall. Engine stalling would result in a loss of vehicle propulsion which, in conjunction with traffic and road conditions, and the driver’s reactions, could increase the risk of a crash causing property damage and/or personal injury. Correction: Dealers will install a waterproof cover over the ECU. A damaged ECU will be replaced. 

There are also a few braking issues being experienced in the Honda camp. Vehicle stability assist modules in the Honda Pilot, Acura MDX, and Acura RL may engage a small amount of braking force when the driver is nowhere near the brake pedal. Or, even worse, if a driver does depress the brake pedal, the amount of force applied may be significantly different than intended.

Honda will fix the issue with wires, capacitors, and electronic witchcraft.

Years affected: 2005 (all models), 2006 (MDX)
Units affected: 7,794

From Transport Canada: Certain vehicles may experience a malfunction of the Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) system, which could apply a small amount of brake force for a fraction of a second, even if the brake pedal has not been depressed. If the driver applies the brakes during a malfunction, the VSA system may employ the brake assist feature, which would increase braking force, exceeding the driver’s intended input. In either instance, an unexpected and unnecessary brake application could increase the risk of a crash causing property damage and/or personal injury. Correction: Dealers will install a partial wiring harness containing a capacitor for the VSA modulator.

Nissan

The Ghosn Show has also seen its fair share of recalls this week.

First up, the brand new Nissan NV commercial van. The chemists at Nissan have figured out the rust protectant solution and the foam used as a sound damper in the shift mechanism don’t necessarily get along. This can cause the transmission to move out of “P” without the brake pedal being depressed. In other words, the Nissan NV is the new Audi 5000.

Years affected: 2013
Units affected: 153

From Transport Canada: On certain vehicles, a change in the solution used for anti-rust protection (applied during vehicle assembly) resulted in a chemical reaction that affected the foam that is used as a sound dampener in the shifter mechanism. This may cause the foam to adhere to the lever lock, preventing it from returning to the locked position. If this occurs, the transmission gear shift lever could be moved out of the PARK position without depressing the brake pedal. Depending which gear the driver selects, the vehicle could begin to move forward or backward immediately. This movement could result in property damage, or cause the vehicle to strike a bystander, potentially resulting in personal injury. Correction: Dealers will remove the foam dampener from the shifter mechanism.

There is another recall for the NV as well, again involving the transmission. This recall includes 2012 models as well. A lock clip may have been installed incorrectly, allowing a transmission cable to migrate and the driver to remove the key from the ignition even if the vehicle really isn’t in park.

Years affected: 2012-2013
Units affected: 2,153

From Transport Canada: On certain vehicles, the transmission lever gear selector plate lock clip may have been installed incorrectly during vehicle assembly. Over time, the clip could disengage from the steering column bracket, allowing the transmission cable to move out of position. If this occurs, the transmission shift lever will not match the actual gear position. The driver would be able to remove the key from the ignition, even if the transmission is not actually in the PARK position. This could allow the vehicle to roll away, which could result in a crash causing personal injury and/or property damage. Correction: Dealers will inspect and, if necessary, reposition the clip.

Oh, you thought we were done with Nissan recalls? Not quite.

If you own a 2013 Nissan Sentra, Altima, Pathfinder or Infiniti JX35, the Occupant Detection System may be faulty, causing the passenger airbag to not deploy in the event of a crash. It’s a good thing manufacturers are using soft touch plastics on the dash.

The fix: replace the ODS sensors. Simple as that.

Years affected: 2013
Units affected: 3000

From Transport Canada: On certain vehicles, sensors within the Occupant Detection System (ODS) may have been manufactured incorrectly. This may cause the system to malfunction and permanently suppress the passenger airbag. Failure of the passenger frontal airbag to deploy during a crash (where deployment is warranted) could increase the risk of personal injury to the seat occupant. Correction: Dealers will inspect and, if necessary, replace the ODS sensors.

Bentley

Last but not least, the crew from Crewe have a daytime running light recall. The issue is fairly minor and there is no real safety concern here. The model years affected are pretty broad though, as all Bentley Continenal Flying Spur, GT, and GTC models between 2004 and 2013 model years are targeted.

Basically, the DRL system doesn’t meet Canadian regulations in certain instances. Pretty boring stuff.

The interesting tidbit: 980 cars are affected. Seriously? There were 980 Bentley Continentals sold in Canada in the past 10 years? Mind blowing.

From Transport Canada: Certain vehicles do not comply with the requirements Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 – Lighting System and Retroreflective Devices. The Daytime Running Lights (DRL) system does not meet requirements of the standard when the sidelights are manually selected on the headlamp switch. Correction: Dealers will modify the DRL system.