Test Drive: 2013 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 DoubleCab V6 trucks toyota car test drives reviews
Test Drive: 2013 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 DoubleCab V6 trucks toyota car test drives reviews
2013 Toyota Tacoma 4×4 DoubleCab V6. Click image to enlarge

The steering wheel is manually adjustable for reach and height, and it was a good wheel to work with. It matters when you head off road. It has controls for the stereo and phone functions. Behind the steering wheel sits an instrument cluster and a small trip meter screen.

The centre stack starts with Toyota’s touchscreen head unit at the top. It’s pretty basic, handling audio and phone functions. The stereo, feeding off AM, FM, auxiliary, USB and CD sources, sounds pretty good. Below that is an old-school “Hi, I was in Toyotas about 30 years ago” digital clock and underneath that, you’ll find a simple, manual climate control system.

The console houses some open storage, three cupholders, the gear selector and an armrest.

The rearview mirror displays some goodies, namely the outside temperature and a compass reading AND it has a small screen for the back-up camera with multi-hued distance markings. People complain bitterly about these, but in my opinion, I’d much rather have a little screen up there than none at all. You also get three HomeLink garage door opener buttons.

There are two 12V plugs and an auxiliary/USB plug on the center stack.

Getting into the rear seats is fine, other than the step up. Here you’ll find three seats, three seatbelts and three headrests. The two outboard seats are comfortable and I found the headroom and legroom to be very reasonable. What else do you get back there? Two cupholders at the back of the center console, seatback storage pockets and a sliding center rear window.

The rear headrests, which can impede the rearward vision, fold down out of the way, and the seat bottoms can flip forward out of the way. Under the seat bottoms are small but useful lidded storage bins.

Our three kids fit back there like a charm, with space to spare and you’ll find two sets of LATCH anchors for their seats.

Test Drive: 2013 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 DoubleCab V6 trucks toyota car test drives reviews Test Drive: 2013 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 DoubleCab V6 trucks toyota car test drives reviews Test Drive: 2013 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 DoubleCab V6 trucks toyota car test drives reviews Test Drive: 2013 Toyota Tacoma 4x4 DoubleCab V6 trucks toyota car test drives reviews
2013 Toyota Tacoma 4×4 DoubleCab V6. Click image to enlarge

In terms of exterior conveniences, this Tacoma had a tow package with a hitch receiver and a seven-pin plug, and a 120V plug in the box. It seals with a spring-loaded lid, and can be switched from 100W to 400W inside the truck.

Toyota did a great job in using all the nooks and crannies to maximize storage around the cabin. You get little bins and trays all over the place, including a deep, carpeted one under the armrest.

If you run out of space in the cabin, there’s this thing called a ‘box’ that sits right behind the cabin. Toyota has added a couple of small, lidded (but not lockable) bins in the sides of the box. You get four heavy-duty tie-downs, and for great flexibility, there are rails along the sides and the front of the box, allowing you to position further tie-down points anywhere you want.

That V6 rewards you with some goodness, and that is plenty of low-end and mid-range torque. I never found myself wanting for more in everyday driving. That torque likely bodes well for off-roading as well as towing, although I tested neither of those facets.

The ride is exactly what you might expect from an off-road worthy truck. It’s firm, and a bit bouncy and it will soak up any road imperfections with ease. Speed bump? I didn’t notice any speed bump. Of course, if you encounter any kind of crack, or pothole, or other kind of Canadian road enhancement device, the truck will shudder and buck over it, and remind you that it can flex with the best of them. This isn’t a knock – every other truck does it, and until we figure out how to get rid of leaf-spring suspensions that essentially date back over 100 years, that won’t change.




About Tom Sedens

Tom Sedens is an Edmonton-based automobile journalist, husband, dad and driving enthusiast, as well as an accredited member of AJAC.