Like almost all Porsches, the Boxster works excellently as a daily driver. Unlike some of its more expensive stablemates, this “Poor-Man’s Porsche” (good grief! I only wish I was this poor) might reasonably be expected to see year-round use. In Vancouver, that means plenty of wet, slushy, drizzly, miserable days like Eyeore’s been left in charge of the weather machine. Mike Schlee similarly proved that a base Boxster is a perfectly serviceable winter ride for the GTA, even in inclement weather.

Test Drive: 2013 Porsche  Boxster S car test drives reviews porsche luxury cars
Test Drive: 2013 Porsche  Boxster S car test drives reviews porsche luxury cars
2013 Porsche Boxster. Click image to enlarge

While the options sheet on my tester showed the box checked for 20-inch Carrera-style alloys ($1,790, thank you very much), the fitted wheels were actually 19 inches – winter tires could not be found to fit the larger option. The snowies installed were Michelin Sport Alpins.

First day spent behind the wheel saw a light frosting of snow; rare enough to make the West Coast the envy of Canada, disastrous enough to make our all-season-tire-shod SUVs a national laughingstock.

Threading through a sea of terrified pachyderms, the Boxster’s mid-engined excellence showed why this car is so great Monday-to-Friday. It is as predictable as a Michael Bay movie without any of the pyrotechnic fuss: planted, composed, unruffled.

Sport Chrono is installed on this car (at a $2,110 premium), as is Porsche’s Active Stability Management (PASM, $2,050). Default setting has both throttle response and suspension damping set for maximum compliance; it’s surprising how big-car this little two-seater can feel on the open highway.

In both this and the 911, Porsche has made great strides forward in reducing in-cabin tire noise. A used previous-generation 911 might be an attractive purchasing alternative, given how easy it is to option up a Boxster (my tester hits the pocket-book for $88,495), but it’s worth noting that the newer car is a considerably more polished driving experience.

Navigation and general cockpit layout are also considerably more polished, with the exception of the button-placement for the temperature controls – these can be blocked when the shifter is in one of the odd-numbered gears.

The rightmost of the three gauge pods is an LCD display that can be toggled between various information screens, of varying degrees of usefulness. Among other things, the navigation system displays turning information, which works well when approaching oddly split interchanges.

Test Drive: 2013 Porsche  Boxster S car test drives reviews porsche luxury cars Test Drive: 2013 Porsche  Boxster S car test drives reviews porsche luxury cars Test Drive: 2013 Porsche  Boxster S car test drives reviews porsche luxury cars Test Drive: 2013 Porsche  Boxster S car test drives reviews porsche luxury cars
2013 Porsche Boxster. Click image to enlarge

The Bose audio system appears to be excellent. I say appears, because I can’t work out why on Earth you’d ever want to do anything other than put down the top and listen to that big flat-six burble away merrily behind you.

In fact, given that the rearward visibility is so bad with the fabric top up (tip: set your side mirrors a degree or so beyond being able to see the side of the car in them), most of the week was spent in top-down motoring. Why not? The three-level heated seats keep your buns so toasty they should be emblazoned with Quiznos logos.

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