But what does all this mean on the road? Is the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 just another tire, or is it really something different?

We drove several vehicles and competitive tires in handling (road course), dry and wet braking and dry and wet autocross exercises at New Orleans Motorsports Park (NOLA) to get a sense of differences and similarities between the Pilot Sport A/S 3 and competitive tires, including dedicated performance tires from Bridgestone, Continental, Pirelli and Goodyear.

Although conditions were cold and blustery, and the day’s schedule was busy, three observations could be clearly made.

Product Review: Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 tire reviews auto product reviews
Product Review: Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3. Click image to enlarge

The first was that the Pilot Sport A/S 3 excels in handling maneuvers. Lateral movement is satisfyingly sharp, comparable to that of a dedicated performance tire like the Bridgestone S-04 Pole Position. This is a surprise, as I have the latter tire fitted to my personal summer car, a Honda S2000, so I’m familiar with its excellent performance.

The second observation is that the Pilot Sport A/S 3 offers impressive levels of ride comfort. By this I don’t mean that it’s in any way soft, but it is smooth and quiet; not harsh at all. A dedicated performance tire (coupled with a firm suspension) often favours handling at the expense of ride, but with this Michelin tire, car owners, especially those in luxury performance sedans and coupes, may find in the Pilot Sport A/S 3 a satisfactory combination of both.

Product Review: Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 tire reviews auto product reviews
Product Review: Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3. Click image to enlarge

Finally, and perhaps the tour de force of this tire, is its performance in wet conditions. There was virtually no difference exhibited in the performance of this tire in wet or dry exercises. For instance, a controlled emergency braking test from 60 mph (96 km/h) to zero, driving an Infiniti G37 fitted with Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 tires on a dry surface, my result was a stopping distance of 114 feet (34.7 metres).

In the same car, on the same tires on the same surface, only wet, my stopping distance was 115 feet (35 m).

Although some of the competitive tires equaled the dry braking test (or bettered it by a small percentage), none were as close to their dry test in the wet. In fact, some exhibited over three metres difference.

Related Articles:
Tire Review: Cooper Zeon RS3-S
Tire Review: Sailun Z4+AS
Tire Review: Goodyear Eagle F1
Tire Review: Bridgestone LM-60

Manufacturer’s Website:
Michelin Canada

Photo Gallery:
Product Review: Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3

This is a tire I’d consider purchasing for a luxury performance coupe or sedan without hesitation. It could also do very well on a sports car, extending its driving season in Canada further into the fall, and putting the car back on the road (if stored) earlier in the spring.

The Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 will be available in Canada in May, 2013. Expected to be priced competitively against Michelin’s dedicated performance (summer) tires, the full list of available sizes will be available May 1, 2013.




About Paul Williams

Paul Williams is an Ottawa-based freelance automotive writer and senior writer for Autos. He is a member of the Automobile Journalists Association of Canada (AJAC).