September 16, 2004


Safety organization proposes standard for tire pressure monitoring devices

Washington, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) proposed a new safety standard to warn the driver when a tire is significantly under-inflated.

The proposal requires manufacturers to install a four-tire Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) that is capable of detecting when a tire is more than 25 percent under-inflated and warning the driver.

The new standard also proposes to add a malfunction indicator to the requirements, which would warn the driver when the system is not working properly. For example, sometimes tires are installed on the vehicle that are incompatible with the TPMS, or sometimes other problems cause the TPMS to become inoperative.

The new Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard would apply to passenger cars, trucks, multipurpose passenger vehicles, and buses with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or less, except those vehicles with dual wheels on an axle.

The NHTSA proposes the following three-year phase-in schedule:

  • In the first model year, beginning Sept. 1, 2005, 50 percent of all light vehicles manufactured would comply.

  • In the second model year, beginning Sept. 1, 2006, 90 percent of all light vehicles manufactured would comply.
  • After Sept. 1, 2007, all light vehicles manufactured would comply.

Connect with Autos.ca