October 19, 2004


Kids need to “see and be seen” – safety council

Laval, Quebec – According to a recent survey conducted by J.D. Power and Associates on behalf of Alliance Tire Professionals, almost half (48 per cent) of Canadian motorists say their greatest fear when driving during the fall and winter is “not seeing children because they are wearing dark clothing.” This concern is greater than the worry over “reduced visibility due to piles of leaves or snow banks” (30 per cent) and “inadequately lit streets” (18 per cent).

“With children back at school and Halloween fast approaching, the issue of visibility on the roads becomes of increasing importance as daylight hours wane,” says Yves Mourant, Alliance Tire Professionals regional advisor. “It’s
important to educate kids at a young age about road safety and teach them the
importance of being visible on the roads – especially at this time of year.”

Halloween is a time of excitement, but it’s also a time when many
children are navigating the streets for the first time. To help increase awareness around children’s road safety this fall, Alliance Tire Professionals and the Canada Safety Council are bringing the Kids On Patrol (K.O.P.) program back to Canadian schools for a second year.

Launched in the fall of 2003, K.O.P. promotes the importance of road safety and proper visibility through the “See and Be Seen” message, which is incorporated into curriculum-based resources provided free of charge to schools across the country. The program, which targets children in grades two and three, will run in conjunction with the Council’s National School Safety Week from October 17 – 23, 2004.

In support of the program, Alliance Tire Professionals dealers across Canada will also be handing out retro-reflective armbands – free of charge to children – while supplies last.

“Wearing retro-reflective materials is an excellent way for children to
be seen by motorists on Halloween or at any time of the year,” says Emile
Therien, Canada Safety Council president. “Whether it’s playing road hockey at
dusk or walking to the school bus in the morning, being seen by motorists
needs to be a priority for kids from dawn to dusk.”

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