Aug 17, 2007


Ford sets land speed record with hydrogen racecar

A team of Ford Motor Company engineers celebrate with the Ford Fusion Hydrogen 999 after the car reached 207.297 mph today at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Wendover, Utah.
A team of Ford Motor Company engineers celebrate with the Ford Fusion Hydrogen 999 after the car reached 207.297 mph today at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Wendover, Utah. Click image to enlarge

Wendover, Utah – The Ford Motor Company has become the world’s first automaker to set a land speed record for a production-based fuel cell-powered car. The Ford Fusion Hydrogen 999 fuel cell car set the record on the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah at 207.297 mph (333.612 km/hr).

The 999 was built in collaboration with Ballard Power Systems of Burnaby, B.C., and Roush and Ohio State University. Ford researchers are also supporting student engineers from the university on the Buckeye Bullet 2, a streamliner-type fuel cell-powered racer attempting to top 300 mph.

“What we’ve accomplished is nothing short of an industry first,” says Gerhard Schmidt, vice-president, Research & Advanced Engineering for Ford Motor Company. “No other automaker in the world has come close. We are excited to have accomplished something never before done. We established this project to advance fuel cell-powered vehicles and to do what has never been done before, and we did it.”

Schmidt said the run, reached during the Bonneville Nationals which wrap up today, will further expand the company’s technological horizons, and is another step toward commercially-viable hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

The Fusion Hydrogen 999 is named in honour of Henry Ford’s 999, a prize-winning race car built in 1902.

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