New York, New York – While most consumers continue to place great importance on automotive safety systems, there is also growing demand for automated driver-assistance and traffic-avoidance technologies, according to a new global study by Accenture.

Surveying consumers in seven countries, Accenture found that 91 per cent of respondents said that of the safety technologies currently offered, the one they would most like to use is a lane changing/blind spot warning system. For future technologies, 83 per cent would like in-vehicle technologies that can automatically contact a vehicle recovery organization if the vehicle breaks down, while 75 per cent want a system that automatically calls the nearest emergency centre in the event of a crash, and 73 per cent would like technology that would automatically stop the vehicle and send out an emergency call when needed, such as if the driver or passenger suffers a heart attack or similar illness. Technology that can identify traffic signals, congestion, crashes and delays and warn the driver would be appreciated by 83 per cent.

Nine of the 12 technologies consumers would most like to have in their vehicles are safety-related, with 83 per cent wanting anti-lock braking systems, 74 per cent want night vision, 73 per cent want reversing sensors, 69 per cent would like a lane-keeping system, 68 per cent want an in-vehicle alcohol tester, and 63 per cent want a fatigue warning device.

With communication technology, 63 per cent would like to use car-to-car communications, 59 per cent would be interested in smartphone controls on the steering wheel, 58 per cent would like to be able to read and dictate emails in the vehicle, and 57 per cent are interested in a head-up display on the windshield that shows vehicle speed and what is happening on the road ahead.

Highlights in the survey by country were:

United States – 91 per cent of respondents not currently using the technology would like to have an automated breakdown call system, 90 per cent want traffic-avoidance technology, 81 per cent want monitors so passengers can watch DVDs or television, and 79 per cent want to stream music.

France – 92 per cent want a traffic-avoidance device, 879 per cent want automated breakdown call capacity, 87 per cent would like to operate a smartphone with steering wheel controls, and 83 per cent want monitors for DVDs and television for passengers.

Italy – The majority would like traffic-avoidance and automated breakdown call capabilities, while 79 per cent would like DVD monitors, 75 per cent want smartphone controls, and 73 per cent would like to read or dictate emails.

China – 93 per cent would like traffic avoidance, 89 per cent want automated breakdown calling, and 72 per cent want music streaming.

Malaysia – Consumers are much more focused on communication and information systems, with 92 per cent preferring automated breakdown calling, 82 per cent want traffic avoidance, 81 per cent want stolen vehicle recovery and tracking, 77 per cent want automated emergency calls in crashes, and 72 per cent would like a feature that stops the vehicle and sends for help in a dire medical situation.

South Korea and Brazil – The countries are similar in their preferences. In South Korea, 93 per cent would prefer an automated breakdown call system, 89 per cent want stolen vehicle recovery and tracking, 87 per cent want automated emergency calls in crashes, and 81 per cent want traffic avoidance. In Brazil, 89 per cent want automated breakdown calls and traffic avoidance, 86 per cent want emergency calling in a crash, and 85 per cent want stolen vehicle recovery and tracking.

Connect with Autos.ca