A new review of child pedestrian research from Safe Kids Canada has found that more child pedestrian injuries take place on residential roads than anywhere else, and the danger is greatly increased as speed increases.
A new review of child pedestrian research from Safe Kids Canada has found that more child pedestrian injuries take place on residential roads than anywhere else, and the danger is greatly increased as speed increases. Click image to enlarge

Toronto, Ontario – A new review of child pedestrian research from Safe Kids Canada has found that more child pedestrian injuries take place on residential roads than anywhere else, and the danger is greatly increased as speed increases. The report was released yesterday as part of the kickoff of Safe Kids Week, which included a display of 30 backpacks to symbolize the children killed each year as pedestrians. Safe Kids Canada is the national injury prevention program of The Hospital for Sick Children.

Pedestrian incidents are a leading cause of injury-related deaths for Canadian children under the age of 14, with approximately 30 children killed each year and 2,412 seriously injured. The average child pedestrian killed is male, between the ages of 10 and 14, and is crossing the street at an intersection within five kilometres of his home. Most incidents occur between 3 and 6 p.m., when many Canadians are driving home from work.

The research also demonstrates that a child hit by a car travelling at 50 km/h has an 80 per cent chance of being killed, while a child hit by a car travelling at 30 km/h has up to a 95 per cent chance of surviving.

“We know that child pedestrian injuries are preventable,” said Pamela Fuselli, executive director of Safe Kids Canada. “The fact is, the majority of children are being hit at an intersection where adults have told them it is safe to cross the street. The evidence shows that drivers can yield to child pedestrians and avoid collisions if they drive the posted speed limit. We’re encouraging all drivers to be aware of their speed and drive the posted speed limit. It could mean the difference between life and death to a child.”

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